• Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - A luxurious way of travelling

    A luxurious
    way of travelling

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - The island of the winds

    Ventus
    The island of the winds

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Sunbathing under the Greek Sun

    Sunbathing
    under the Greek Sun

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Mykonian Sunset at little Venice

    Mykonian Sunset
    at little Venice

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Breakfast with a view

    Breakfast
    with a view

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Cycladic architecture

    Cycladic
    architecture

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Yachting in the Aegean sea

    Yachting
    in the Aegean sea

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Endless big blue

    Endless
    big blue

  • Ventus Luxury Mykonos Villas - Mykonos  town, strolling on the streets

    Mykonos town
    strolling on the streets

About Mykonos villa names

The names of our luxury mykonos villas and resorts were inspired from Greek mythology and each name has a meaning.

Our villas names:
Adonis:

In Greek mythology, is the god of beauty and desire, and is a central figure in various mystery religions. His religion belonged to women: the dying of Adonis was fully developed in the circle of young girls around the poet Sappho from the island of Lesbos, about 600 BC.

Aegle:

She is the name of several different figures in Greek mythology. In one of each she is one of the daughters of Asclepius by Epione, according to the Suda or by Lampetia, the daughter of the Sun, according to Hermippus. Her name is said to have derived from "Αἴγλη" ("Aegle"), meaning "Brightness," or "Splendor," either from the beauty of the human body when in good health, or from the honor paid to the medical profession.

Alcyone:

In Greek mythology is the name of one of the Pleiades, daughters of Atlas and Pleione or, more rarely, Aethra. She attracted the attention of the god Poseidon and bore him several children, variously named in the sources: Hyrieus, Lycus, Hyperenor, and Aethusa; Hyperes and Anthas; Glaucus and Epopeus. There are various etymological interpretations of her name's origin.

Aphrodite:

She is the Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. Her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus. She is identified with the planet Venus. Because of her beauty, other gods feared that their rivalry over her would interrupt the peace among them and lead to war, so Zeus married her to Hephaestus, who, because of his ugliness and deformity, was not seen as a threat. Aphrodite had many lovers both gods, such as Ares, and men, such as Anchises.

Aura:

In Greek and Roman mythology, Aura is the divine personification of the breeze. The plural form, Aurae, "Breezes," is often found. Aurae are also said to partially resemble ghosts, and can become part of the breeze, or can prevent it. They appear to disappear into the air, which, along with the fact that they glide, is why they are often mistaken for spirits of the departed. They are also said to sometimes work with Aeolus, Master of Winds, and are the more gentle cousins of the Harpies.

Calypso:

She was an Oceanid a sea nymph in Greek mythology, who lived on the island of Ogygia. She is generally said to be the daughter of the Titan Atlas. Calypso is remembered most for her role in Homer's Odyssey, in which she keeps the fabled Greek hero Odysseus on her island to make him her immortal husband. According to Homer, Calypso kept Odysseus prisoner at Ogygia for seven years.

Demeter:

In ancient Greek religion and myth, Demeter is the goddess of the harvest, who presided over grains and the fertility of the earth. Though Demeter is often described simply as the goddess of the harvest, she presided also over the sacred law, and the cycle of life and death. She and her daughter Persephone were the central figures of the Eleusinian Mysteries that predated the Olympian pantheon.

Dione:

She is one of the Titanides or Titanesses. She is called a daughter of Oceanus and Tethys, hence an Oceanid, and otherwise a daughter of Gaia and either Uranus or Aether. She and Zeus are called the parents of Aphrodite by some ancient sources.

Eros:

In Greek mythology, was the Greek god of love. His Roman counterpart was Cupid. Eros appears in ancient Greek sources under several different guises. In the earliest sources (the cosmogonies, the earliest philosophers, and texts referring to the mystery religions), he is one of the primordial gods involved in the coming into being of the cosmos. But in later sources, Eros is represented as the son of Aphrodite, whose mischievous interventions in the affairs of gods and mortals cause bonds of love to form, often illicitly. Ultimately, in the later satirical poets, he is represented as a blindfolded child, the precursor to the chubby Renaissance Cupid – whereas in early Greek poetry and art, Eros was depicted as an adult male who embodies sexual power, and a profound artist.

Ersi:

She is a figure in Greek mythology, daughter of Cecrops, sister to Aglauros and Pandrosos. According to the Bibliotheca, when Hephaestus unsuccessfully attempted to rape Athena, she wiped his semen off her leg with wool and threw it on the ground, impregnating Gaia. Athena wished to make the resulting infant Erichthonius immortal and to raise it, so she gave it to three sisters, Ersi, Aglauros and Pandrosos, in a willow basket and warned them to never open it. Aglauros and Ersi disobeyed her and opened the basket which contained the infant and future king, Erichthonius, who was somehow mixed or intertwined with a snake. The sight caused Ersi and Aglauros to go insane and they jumped to their deaths off the Acropolis. Shrines were constructed for Ersi and Aglauros on the Acropolis.

Gaia:

In Greek mythology, Gaia was the personification of the Earth, one of the Greek primordial deities. Gaia was the great mother of all: the primal Greek Mother Goddess; creator and giver of birth to the Earth and all the Universe; the heavenly gods, the Titans, and the Giants were born to her. The gods reigning over their classical pantheon were born from her union with Uranus (the sky), while the sea-gods were born from her union with Pontus (the sea). Her equivalent in the Roman pantheon was Terra.

Helios:

He was the personification of the Sun in Greek mythology. He is the son of the Titan Hyperion with various mothers (Theia (Hesiod) or Euryphaessa (Homeric Hymn 31)) and brother of the goddesses Selene, the moon, and Eos, the dawn. Helios was described as a handsome god crowned with the shining aureole of the Sun, who drove the chariot of the sun across the sky each day to earth-circling Oceanus and through the world-ocean returned to the East at night.

Hephaestus:

He is the Greek god of blacksmiths, craftsmen, artisans, sculptors, metals, metallurgy, fire and volcanoes. Hephaestus' Roman equivalent is Vulcan. In Greek mythology, Hephaestus was the son of Zeus and Hera, the king and queen of the gods. As a smithing god, Hephaestus made all the weapons of the gods in Olympus. He served as the blacksmith of the gods, and was worshipped in the manufacturing and industrial centers of Greece, particularly Athens.

Hera:

She is the wife and one of three sisters of Zeus in the Olympian pantheon of Greek mythology and religion. Her chief function was as the goddess of women and marriage. Her counterpart in the religion of ancient Rome was Juno. The cow, lion and the peacock were considered sacred to her. Hera's mother is Rhea and her father Cronus. Hera was known for her jealous and vengeful nature against Zeus's lovers and offspring, but also against mortals who crossed her, such as Pelias. Paris also earned Hera's hatred by choosing Aphrodite as the most beautiful goddess.

Hermes:

He is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia. He is second youngest of the Olympian gods. He is a god of transitions and boundaries. He is quick and cunning, and moves freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, as emissary and messenger of the gods, intercessor between mortals and the divine, and conductor of souls into the afterlife. He is protector and patron of travelers, herdsmen, thieves, orators and wit, literature and poets, athletics and sports, invention and trade. In some myths he is a trickster, and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or the sake of humankind.

Jason:

He was an ancient Greek mythological hero who was famous for his role as the leader of the Argonauts and their quest for the Golden Fleece. He was the son of Aeson, the rightful king of Iolcos. He was married to the sorceress Medea. Because he belongs to mythology, he may have existed before the Greek Dark Ages (1100–800 BC.) The people who wrote about Jason lived around 300 BC. Jason appeared in various literary works in the classical world of Greece and Rome, including the epic poem Argonautica and the tragedy Medea. In Argonautica Jason assembled a great group of heroes, known as the Argonauts after their ship, the Argo. The group of heroes included the Boreads (sons of Boreas, the North Wind) who could fly, Heracles, Philoctetes, Peleus, Telamon, Orpheus, Castor and Pollux, Atalanta, and Euphemus.

Nephele:

In Greek mythology, Nephele was a cloud nymph who figured prominently in the story of Phrixus and Helle. Greek myth also has it that Nephele is the cloud whom Zeus created in the image of Hera to trick Ixion to test his integrity after displaying his lust for Hera during a feast as a guest of Zeus. Ixion failed in restraining his lust for Hera, thus fathering the Centaurs.

Odysseus:

Also known by the Roman name Ulysses, was a legendary Greek king of Ithaca and a hero of Homer's epic poem the Odyssey. Odysseus also plays a key role in Homer's Iliad and other works in that same Epic Cycle. Husband of Penelope, father of Telemachus, and son of Laërtes and Anticlea, Odysseus is renowned for his brilliance, guile, and versatility, and is hence known by the epithet Odysseus the Cunning. He is most famous for the ten eventful years he took to return home after the decade-long Trojan War.

Orion:

He was a giant huntsman in Greek mythology whom Zeus placed among the stars as the constellation of Orion. In Greek literature he first appears as a great hunter in Homer's epic the Odyssey, where Odysseus sees his shade in the underworld. The bare bones of his story are told by the Hellenistic and Roman collectors of myths, but there is no extant literary version of his adventures comparable.

Orpheus:

He was a legendary musician, poet, and prophet in ancient Greek religion and myth. The major stories about him are centered on his ability to charm all living things and even stones with his music, his attempt to retrieve his wife, Eurydice, from the underworld, and his death at the hands of those who could not hear his divine music. For the Greeks, Orpheus was a founder and prophet of the so-called "Orphic" mysteries. He was credited with the composition of the Orphic Hymns, a collection of which survives.

Penelope:

In Homer's Odyssey, Penelope is the faithful wife of Odysseus, who keeps her suitors at bay in his long absence and is eventually reunited with him. Her name has traditionally been associated with marital faithfulness. Penelope is the daughter of Icarius and his wife Periboea. She only has one son by Odysseus, Telemachus, who was born just before Odysseus was called to fight in the Trojan War. She waits twenty years for the final return of her husband, during which she devises various strategies to delay marrying one of the 108 suitors.

Thoi:

In Greek mythology by the name Thoi is known as one of the 50 Nereid as well as one of the Oceanid (both persons may coincide). Thoi is one of the 32 Nereids mentioned in Homer's Iliad that came to mourn with Thetis from sea depths in the Troad coast for the future death of her son Achilles.

Uranus:

He was the primal Greek god personifying the sky. His equivalent in Roman mythology was Caelus. In Ancient Greek literature, Uranus or Father Sky was the son and husband of Gaia, Mother Earth. According to Hesiod's Theogony, Uranus was conceived by Gaia alone, but other sources cite Aether as his father. Uranus and Gaia were the parents of the first generation of Titans, and the ancestors of most of the Greek gods. Most Greeks considered Uranus to be primordial, and gave him no parentage, believing him to have been born from Chaos, the primal form of the universe.

Zeus:

He is the "Father of Gods and men" who rules the Olympians of Mount Olympus, according to the ancient Greek religion. He is the god of sky and thunder in Greek mythology. Zeus is the child of Cronus and Rhea, and the youngest of his siblings. In most traditions he is married to Hera, although, at the oracle of Dodona, his consort is Dione: according to the Iliad, he is the father of Aphrodite by Dione. He is known for his erotic escapades. These resulted in many godly and heroic offspring, including Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Persephone (by Demeter), Dionysus, Perseus, Heracles, Helen of Troy, Minos, and the Muses (by Mnemosyne); by Hera, he is usually said to have fathered Ares, Hebe and Hephaestus.

Our resort names:
Argo:

In Greek mythology, Argo was the ship on which Jason and the Argonauts sailed from Iolcos to retrieve the Golden Fleece. She was named after her builder, Argus.Argo was constructed by the shipwright Argus, and its crew were specially protected by the goddess Hera. The best source for the myth is the Argonautica by Apollonius Rhodius. According to a variety of sources of the legend, Argo was said to have been planned or constructed with the help of Athena.After the successful journey, Argo was consecrated to Poseidon in the Isthmus of Corinth. She was then translated into the sky and turned into the constellation of Argo Navis.

Celestial Nymphs:

They are bound by the cycles of moon and stars. Opposite to them are the Underworld Nymphs. Celestial nymphs, when they are seen, seem to carry an inner glow to them. It ranges from the gold of sunshine to the silver shimmer of the stars and moon. Not much is known of Celestial Nymphs though stories abound that they are garbed by the very light that emanates from the stars. It is not often that they appear in their true forms. Most, when appearing before mortals choose a physical body. These tend toward fairer, though celestial nymphs can be given away by the elf-like point to their ears, and a pendant somewhere on their body that houses their celestial glow and powers. Of all the nymph types, Celestial Nymphs are among the only two who are capable of taking a non-corporeal form as well as a physical form.

Elements:

The ancient Greek belief in five basic elements, these being earth (Gaia), water (Pontus), air (Uranus), fire (Helios) and aether (Light), dates from pre-Socratic times and persisted throughout the Middle Ages and into the Renaissance, deeply influencing European thought and culture. These five elements are sometimes associated with the five platonic solids.

Ithaca:

Is an Greek island located in the Ionian Sea, off the northeast coast of Kefalonia and to the west of continental Greece. The epic poems of Homer, the Iliad and the Odyssey, shed some light on Bronze-Age Ithaca. Those poems are generally thought to have been composed sometime in the 9th or 8th centuries BC, but may have made use of older mythological and poetic traditions; their depiction of the hero Odysseus, and his rule over Ithaca and the surrounding islands and mainland, preserve somes memories of the political geography, customs and society of the time.

Oceanids:

In Greek mythology and, later, Roman mythology, the Oceanids are sea nymphs who were the three thousand daughters of the Titans Oceanus and Tethys. Each was the patroness of a particular spring, river, sea, lake, pond, pasture, flower or cloud. Some of them were closely associated with the Titan gods (such as Calypso, Clymene, Asia, Electra) or personified abstract concepts (Tyche, Peitho).

Olympus:

In Greek mythology Olympus was the home of the Twelve Olympian gods of the ancient Greek world. In myth, Olympus formed after the gods defeated the Titans in the Titan War, and soon the place was inhabited by the gods. It is the setting of many Greek mythical stories. The Twelve Olympian gods lived in the gorges, where there were also their palaces. Pantheon (today Mytikas) was their meeting place and theater of their stormy discussions. The Throne of Zeus (today Stefani) hosted solely him, the leader of the gods. From there he unleashed his thunderbolts, expressing his godly wrath. The Twelve Olympians included also Hera, Hestia, Demeter, Poseidon, Athena, Apollo, Artemis, Hermes, Aphrodite, Ares and Hephaestus. Ιn Iliad Olympus is referred as great, long, brilliant and full of trees.

Ourania:

Aphrodite Ourania was an epithet of the Greek goddess Aphrodite, signifying "heavenly" or "spiritual", to distinguish her from her more earthly aspect of Aphrodite Pandemos, "Aphrodite for all the people". The two were used (mostly in literature) to differentiate the more "celestial" love of body and soul from purely physical lust.

Sources:
http://www.mythencyclopedia.com/Ar-Be/Aurora.html
http://en.wikipedia.org/
http://adrasisles.com/